Dental Emergencies

What YOU Can Do in Case of a Dental Emergency:

Knocked out or displaced tooth

Should you ever have a tooth knocked out or moved out of position, time is very important. The sooner the tooth is put back in place the better.

 

  1. If the tooth is still in the socket but is displaced leave it in the socket. These teeth can be repositioned rather easily if you are seen within an hour or so. Get to Dr. Neuhaus' office quickly.
  2. If the tooth is knocked completely out of the socket, the tooth should be rinsed in tap water. Do not scrub or wipe the root. It should not be touched. Leave any tissue attached to the root where it is. Look at the root to see if it is broken or cracked.
  3. Do not worry if the crown is cracked. If the root does not look cracked or broken, put the tooth back in the socket. Bite your back teeth together and hold the tooth in place with your fingers. If you can not bring yourself to place the tooth in the socket, or if it has a cracked or broken root put it in a glass of milk (or, in the absence of milk, cool water), and get to Dr. Neuhaus' office quickly.
  4. If the tooth is a baby tooth it may just be the normal process of being lost so that it can be replaced by a permanent tooth. As a rule, baby teeth are not re-implanted.

 

Fractured Teeth...


Small Tooth Fracture (Chipped tooth, when less than 1/4 of the tooth has broken)

Small fractures (when less than 1/4 of the tooth has broken) can be smoothed by Dr. Neuhaus with a sandpaper disc or repaired with a composite restoration (bonding). In either case, you should treat the tooth with care and call Dr. Neuhaus.

 

The fractured tooth may be sensitive to temperature extremes or to biting. Keep the fractured area clean by gently brushing, if you can not get to Dr. Neuhaus right away. Severe pain is unusual with a small fracture.

 

Larger Tooth Fractures (when more than 1/4 of the tooth has broken)

The fractured tooth may be sensitive to temperature extremes, biting or it may ache.

  1. The first thing concerning most patients is pain relief. Aspirin, Tylenol or Advil are good pain relievers and should be tried first, provided you can use them. Make sure to follow proper dosing instructions. They only work by swallowing them. Do not place aspirin/Advil/Tylenol on the aching tooth or gum. They will burn the lining of your mouth.
  2. Keep the fractured area clean by rinsing the mouth with warm water and gently brushing the area.
  3. Call Dr. Neuhaus.
  4. If you are unable to seek immediate dental care, you may purchase an over-the-counter temporary filling material (available at local drug stores) which you can apply to the tooth yourself. This will reduce discomfort and keep food away from the fractured area. Follow the package's instructions.
  5. Larger tooth fractures include damage to the enamel, dentin, and/or pulp. If the pulp is not permanently damaged, the tooth may be restored with a full permanent crown. If pulpal damage does occur, root canal therapy will be required.

 

Toothache/Oral Pain

If you are having pain it is usually an indication that something is wrong. It may be a tooth, the gums, the bone, the jaw joint or the muscles that move your jaw.

 

The first thing concerning most patients is pain relief. Aspirin, Tylenol or Advil are good pain relievers and should be tried first, provided you can use them. Make sure to follow proper dosing instructions. They only work by swallowing them. Do not place aspirin/Advil/Tylenol on the aching tooth or gum. They will burn the lining of your mouth.

 

Rinse the mouth with warm water. Floss to remove any food that might be trapped between the teeth. See Dr. Neuhaus as soon as possible.

 

Lost Filling

The tooth may be sensitive to temperature extremes, biting or it may ache.

 

  1. If needed, Aspirin, Tylenol or Advil are good pain relievers and should be tried first, provided you can use them. Make sure to follow proper dosing instructions. They only work by swallowing them. Do not place aspirin/Advil/Tylenol on the aching tooth or gum. They will burn the lining of your mouth.
  2. Keep the cavity clean by rinsing the mouth with warm water and gently brushing the area.
  3. Call Dr. Neuhaus.
  4. If you are unable to seek immediate dental care, you may purchase an over-the-counter temporary filling material (available at local drug stores) which you can apply to the tooth yourself. This will reduce discomfort and keep food away from the cavity. Follow the package's instructions.

 

Lost Temporary Crown/Filling

Occasionally, even with careful wearing, temporaries will become loose. This is normally not an emergency. The tooth will not become infected or decayed if the temporary is missing for a short period of time. However, the underlying tooth may feel sensitive to food and drink.

 

  1. If needed, Aspirin, Tylenol or Advil are good pain relievers and should be tried first, provided you can use them. Make sure to follow proper dosing instructions. They only work by swallowing them. Do not place aspirin/Advil/Tylenol on the aching tooth or gum. They will burn the lining of your mouth.
  2. Keep the tooth clean by rinsing the mouth with warm water and gently brushing the area.
  3. Call Dr. Neuhaus.

 

If your temporary dislodges and you are unable to seek immediate dental care...

 

  1. You may put a small amount of Vaseline in the temporary and reseat it on the tooth. This will hold it in place until you can get in and see us or...
  2. You may purchase an over-the-counter temporary cement material (available at local drug stores) which will allow you to replace the temporary yourself. This will reduce discomfort and keep food away from the cavity. Follow the package's instructions.

Injuries to the Soft Tissues of the mouth (lips, cheek, tongue)...

Injuries to the inside of the mouth include tears, puncture wounds and lacerations to the cheek, lips or tongue.

 

  1. Clean dirt from the injured area with warm water.
  2. Place a cold compress on the face near the injury to decrease swelling.
  3. The injured person should be taken to the emergency room for the necessary suturing and wound repair.
  4. Bleeding from a tongue laceration can be reduced by pulling the tongue forward and using gauze to place pressure on the wound area.

Bitten Tongue or Lip

Bleeding from a tongue laceration can be reduced by pulling the tongue forward and using gauze or a clean cloth to place direct pressure on the wound area.

 

If the bleeding doesn't stop, go to a hospital emergency room.

 

Objects Caught Between Teeth

Do not attempt to remove the object with sharp or pointed instruments which could cut the gums. Instead, carefully guide dental floss between the teeth and rinse vigorously with warm water. If this doesn't work, call Dr. Neuhaus.

 

Possible Broken Jaw

Do not move the jaw. Secure the jaw in place by tying a scarf, handkerchief, necktie or towel around the jaw and over the top of the head.

 

Apply cold compresses to swollen areas. Go immediately to a hospital emergency room or call Dr. Neuhaus.

 

Swelling

Should any part of your mouth, jaw, lips or face start swelling due to a dental problem you should seek help as soon as possible, as this often is caused by infection.

 

If the swelling gets bad enough that your eye starts to swell closed, you start having trouble swallowing, or you start running a fever, call Dr. Neuhaus immediately, or go directly to a hospital emergency room.


Problems with Braces and Retainers

 

  1. Cover the ends of irritating wires with a small cotton ball, beeswax or a piece of gauze until you can see your orthodontist.
  2. Do not attempt to remove a wire that is stuck in your cheek, tongue or gum. Go to your orthodontist or Dr. Neuhaus immediately.
  3. If an appliance becomes loose or a piece breaks off, take the appliance and piece to the orthodontist.

Make an Appointment

Feel free to call, email, or use our contact form.

(847)251-0085

 E-mail

office@wilmettedental.com

 

Address

Wilmette Dental, Ltd

344 Linden Ave.

Wilmette, IL 60091

map

 

 

Office Hours

Mon, Tue, Wed:  800am - 530pm

Thu: Noon - 800pm

Fri: Closed

Sat: 800am - 200pm (alternating)

more...

 

Outside our regular business hours, please note our emergency care information.

 


Call

E-mail